Bio

I am currently a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Wagner College in Staten Island, NY where I teach courses on human-environmental relations, cultural geography, the Caribbean, and GIS. I received my PhD from the interdisciplinary Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies, Steven J. Green School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University in 2018. Previously, I was a Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow with the Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

My dissertation – titled “Engineering Colonialism: Race, Class, and the Social History of Flood Control in Guyana” – examined the relationship between colonial political economies of sugar and rice agriculture, processes of racialization under colonialism, and the development of a comprehensive water management system to understand how environmental engineering and its infrastructural commitments have been used to structure and restructure social practices. This work also examines how colonial practices of water management continue shape experiences of flooding and vulnerability along racialized lines today, with a critical focus on the social, political, and economic barriers this history places on the development of socioecological resilience. I am currently in the process of developing this project into a book manuscript.

Beyond Guyana, I am interested in the politics of coastal resilience planning more broadly, with a particular interest in aspects of stakeholder production, place-making, and engineering responses to environmental challenges as well as the myriad ways in which these become entangled in efforts to create environmental justice. I am especially interested in collaborating on projects focused on the development of resilience standards and practices in coastal South Florida and the New York Harbor.

I currently live in Brooklyn, NY with my partner and our cat.

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